Radio/Podcasts

How I Made It: Ayodele Casel

Latino USA

Ayodele Casel is a tap dancer with a career that spans more than 20 years. Her entry point into tap dancing was Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. However, she didn’t start tap dancing until she was a sophomore at the NYU Tisch School of the Arts. Born to a Puerto Rican mother, and a Black father, she didn’t see herself reflected in the silver screen. As her career developed, she began to search for women like her and uncovered a long legacy of Black women tap dancers. In this non-narrated story, Ayodele Casel discusses her career, taking up space in a field dominated by men, and the legacy of Black tap dancers.


Teresa Urrea: The Mexican Joan of Arc

Latino USA

Teresa Urrea was a “curandera,” or a healer, a feminist, and a revolutionary. Her vision of love and equality inspired rebellions in Mexico against the Mexican dicatotor, Porfirio Díaz. In 1892, Porfirio Díaz exiled Teresa Urrea from Mexico. He called her the most dangerous girl in Mexico. She was only 19-years-old. This narrated story tells the history of Teresa Urrea, and local efforts to keep her legacy alive in El Paso, Texas, where she once lived after being exiled from Mexico.


Portrait Of: Carmen Maria Machado

Latino USA

Carmen Maria Machado is a modern-day literary phenomenon. In 2019, Machado published her experimental memoir, “In the Dream House.” The book grapples with her experience in an abusive relationship with her ex-girlfriend. She’s a bestselling author, a National Book Award fiction finalist, and a Guggenheim Fellow. In this two-way with Maria Hinojosa, Machado discusses her Cuban-American identity, horror, and the challenges of writing her memoir.


A Family Conversation On Race and Latinidad

Latino USA

In this non-narrated conversation, two Afro-Latinx cousins: Umar Williams, who is a musician and radio host living in the Twin Cities, and Alexander Newton, a strategy and analytics consultant who lives in Washington, D.C, discuss the murder of George Floyd by a white cop, Derek Chauvin. They also discuss their Panamanian culture, learning Spanish, and the intersection of their Black and Latinx identity.